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RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage

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RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage
Started at 01:49pm on the 10th July, 2018 by Petros
Petros Subject: RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage
Hi everyone, I recently bought RE meteor 1955 and I would like to hear your opinion on how to manage a damage that I found inside the crankcase. What do you suggest? https://ibb.co/j8r0Wo https://ibb.co/iciQxT https://ibb.co/kMEFxT
Posted: 01:49pm 10th July, 2018
Petros Subject: RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage
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Posted: 02:04pm 10th July, 2018
Mark M Subject: RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage
Petros, this is very common I'm afraid, it is usually the result of a broken con-rod hitting the camshaft tunnel after a major engine blow up. The good news is that this damage is very minor to what I usually see. It is more usual that the end of the broken con rod smashes through the bottom of the engine too! You can repair this with JB Weld or some other type of 'liquid steel'. Make a pice of aluminium to fit inside the camshaft tunnel and stick it in place with the JB Weld. You could just use JB weld only, you only need to repair the tunnel enough to let the camshaft sit in a puddle of oil. The original design allows the camshaft to be immersed in it but this isn't really necessary. Just make sure there is clearance so the camshaft can be inserted ok and rotate properly when the 2 halves of the cases are assembled. Good luck!

REgards, Mark
Posted: 04:21pm 10th July, 2018
Petros Subject: RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage
Thanks Mark for the info. Should I ask a welder to try some kind of repair welding or it is not possible to achieve better result than JB weld?
Posted: 08:17pm 10th July, 2018
Revband Subject: RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage
A good welder can do a permanent job on that, BUT, do your homework and ensure that they are good?, A poor welder can create havoc.
Posted: 08:38pm 10th July, 2018
Bullet Whisperer Subject: RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage
Hi Petros, if you can get it alloy welded, that would be best. Failing that, I would use 'Devcon' - this stuff is approved by Lloyd's of London as an insurable repair to cast marine engine components, pump bodies etc. I used some recently to repair the broken oil pump body of a Pre War Sturmey Archer engine. Very good stuff. Regards, Paul.
Posted: 08:39pm 10th July, 2018
stinkwheel Subject: RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage
There are also low temperature aluminium solders which are very good. Require less heat than welding so less likely to cause warping problems. However, they do require a fair bit of heat, you need an oxy- burner of some sort to get enough heat into a crankcase casting for the solder to work. As such, an experienced hand (or a fair bit of practice on scrap) would be best to avoid melting a hole in your workpiece. I believe Allen Millyard uses lumiweld to join the bandsawed crankcases when he builds his 5-cylinder Kawasaki 2-strokes.
Posted: 09:57am 11th July, 2018
PeteF Subject: RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage
I've used Lumiweld to repair alloy castings. I manage with a decent propane torch.
Posted: 11:12pm 13th July, 2018
stinkwheel Subject: RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage
I've used aluminium solder with a standard torch but there is a fair old mass of alloy in the place the OP has a defect. I suspect it'll sink heat away faster than it can be put in. On such bit's, I've recruited an assistant to heat the whole area with a propane blowtorch then point-heated the specific bit I'm soldering with a pen-torch style blowlamp to good effect before now.

Usual story of not enough hands. You need one for the torch, one for the solder and one for the stainless wire. I've still not worked out why (electrochemically) scratching the work area with -specifically- stainless steel wire of some sort (brush or single wire) is necessary, but it is.

I do intend to buy a MAP torch to do the job properly in future though.
Posted: 11:51pm 13th July, 2018
PeteF Subject: RE Meteor 1955 crankcase damage
I always understood that you need to wire brush the job to get through the oxide which forms very quickly on hot alloy. Once the aluminum solder "wets" the job it gets easier.
Posted: 08:24am 15th July, 2018

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